HLN ConsultingSoftware and Services for Public Health

Category Archives

6 Articles

Version 1.9.1.0 of HLN’s Award Winning Open Source Immunization Forecaster Released

Share

Version 1.9.1.0 of HLN’s Award Winning Open Source Immunization Forecaster Released

A new release (v 1.9.1.0) of the Immunization Calculation Engine (ICE) is now available (download ICE v 1.9.1.0). ICE is a state-of-the-art open-source software system that provide ...

A new release (v 1.9.1.0) of the Immunization Calculation Engine (ICE) is now available (download ICE v 1.9.1.0). ICE is a state-of-the-art open-source software system that provides clinical decision support for immunizations (CDSi) for use in Immunization Information Systems (IIS), Electronic Health Record (EHR) and Personal Health Record (PHR) Systems.

The release includes the following changes:

  • Added support for Meningococcal B.
    • Support for Meningococcal B has been added as a new vaccine group, separate from the existing Meningococcal ACWY vaccine group. Meningococcal ACWY will continue to be returned as its own vaccine group.
    • Implementers may need to modify their software to start looking for the new Meningococcal B vaccine group code (835).
  • Logic fixes for HPV and Hep B vaccine groups.
  • Addition of non-U.S. vaccine DTaP-IPV-Hib (CVX 170)
  • Release notes that describe the latest changes in more detail

Please refer to the updated ICE Implementation Guide (v2r17) for information on how to make the appropriate adjustments to your software to be compatible with this release. The guide provides details about the new Meningococcal B vaccine group implementation as well as a few other vaccines and reason codes that have been added. In addition, a “tracked changes version” of this same guide is also available. The tracked changes are intended to make it easier to see what has changed since the prior release (v 1.8.2.0).

You can determine which release of ICE you are using by viewing the README.HISTORY file that is included with each distribution.

Please feel free to e-mail us at ice@hln.com if you have any questions.

See press release.

HLN Releases Roadmap for Open Source ICE Immunization Forecaster

Share

HLN Releases Roadmap for Open Source ICE Immunization Forecaster

HLN has released a product Roadmap for its award winning Immunization Calculation Engine (ICE).  ICE is an open source service-oriented, standards-based immunization forecasting so ...

HLN has released a product Roadmap for its award winning Immunization Calculation Engine (ICE).  ICE is an open source service-oriented, standards-based immunization forecasting software system that evaluates a patient’s immunization history and generates the appropriate immunization recommendations. The Roadmap describes modifications that have already been scheduled for inclusion in new releases of ICE in the near future, in addition to ongoing changes that may be required to maintain compliance with Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations. Addition of new vaccine schedules, changes to core business logic, and additional functionality are all included on the Roadmap. As additional modifications are scheduled they will be published on the Roadmap as well. HLN hopes this information will help clinical organizations seeking to use ICE in their practices and software vendors seeking to incorporate ICE into their products to plan for new feature availability.

ICE provides state-of-the-art clinical decision support for immunizations (CDSi). ICE can be used in Immunization Information Systems (IIS), Electronic Health Records (EHR), Health Information Exchanges (HIEs), and Personal Health Record (PHR) Systems.

See Press Release

HLN Attends August ONC 2017 Technical Interoperability Forum

Share

HLN Attends August ONC 2017 Technical Interoperability Forum

Last week I attended with my colleague Mike Berry the ONC 2017 Technical Interoperability Forum. This meeting was convened under the 21st Century Cures Act passed by Congress in la ...

Last week I attended with my colleague Mike Berry the ONC 2017 Technical Interoperability Forum. This meeting was convened under the 21st Century Cures Act passed by Congress in late 2016. Several hundred attended a series of panel presentations and discussions over one and a half days covering a variety of topics related to interoperability, including discussion of the business case for interoperability, semantics, national networks, and application programming interfaces (APIs). In many ways the speakers were “the usual suspects” involved in national networks, standards development, and HIE planning and implementation.

Nearly two years ago I wrote an essay, The Interoperability of Things, based on the collection of comments received by ONC on the draft Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap. Though I asked the new National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, Dr. Don Rucker, in a previous meeting if the Roadmap was still relevant and he said it was, there was absolutely no mention of this document at the Forum and it did not seem like the Roadmap was the operative guide for ONC activities or thinking. My own essay drew out a number of themes in interoperability I perceived at the time, including: lack of consensus on definition and scope; ambiguity over the role of HIEs, especially at the state level; disagreement over whether the pace of change was too fast or too slow, too general or too specific; and the complex state of consent and privacy laws across the country that really put a crimp in cross-state data sharing.

New Version of HLN’s Award Winning Open Source Immunization Forecaster Released

Share

New Version of HLN’s Award Winning Open Source Immunization Forecaster Released

A new release (v1.8.1.0) of the Immunization Calculation Engine (ICE) is now available. (Download ICE 1.8.2.0). ICE is a state-of-the-art open-source software system that provides ...

A new release (v1.8.1.0) of the Immunization Calculation Engine (ICE) is now available. (Download ICE 1.8.2.0). ICE is a state-of-the-art open-source software system that provides clinical decision support for immunizations (CDSi) for use in Immunization Information Systems (IIS), Electronic Health Record (EHR) and Personal Health Record (PHR) Systems.

The release includes the following changes:

  • Updates to the Polio Vaccine Group and the Meningococcal ACWY Vaccine Group to better reflect latest guidelines, and addition of Influenza vaccine (CVX 185 and 186) to the Influenza Vaccine Group.
  • Combines PCV and PPSV vaccine groups into one, new vaccine group for Pneumococcal. This change was made to better account for shots administered across the patient’s lifetime. (To support this new Pneumococcal vaccine group, implementers may need to make adjustments to stop looking for the old PCV and PPSV vaccine group codes (700 and 720), and start looking for the new vaccine group code (750). Child and adult pneumococcal vaccinations are now evaluated and forecast under this new vaccine group. The PCV and PPSV vaccine groups are no longer supported.)
  • Release notes which describe the above changes to the vaccine group logic in more detail.

Implementers should refer to the new ICE Implementation Guide (v2r15) when making adjustments to be compatible with this latest release, including the new Pneumococcal vaccine group as well as a few other vaccine and evaluation reason codes that have been added. (A “track changes” version of the guide is also available to make it easy to see what has changed since the last release.)

You can determine which release of ICE you are using by viewing the README.HISTORY file that is included with each distribution.

Please feel free to e-mail us at ice@hln.com if you have any questions.

See press release.

Consumer Access to Health Care Data: Still a Challenge

Share

Consumer Access to Health Care Data: Still a Challenge

Consumers continue to be frustrated with lack of access to their healthcare data, even as wearables and other consumer-targeted devices and services continue to sprout. Recently, O ...

Consumers continue to be frustrated with lack of access to their healthcare data, even as wearables and other consumer-targeted devices and services continue to sprout. Recently, ONC launched a Consumer Health Data Aggregator Challenge to spur the development of new applications and partnerships to provide aggregated health data to patients. While the financial “prize” for this effort is meager, recognition by ONC might be the real brass ring. This challenge focuses on the use of FHIR exclusively to support interoperability between systems and present data to consumers. I suspect that applicants will have some trouble meeting the requirements of the challenge effectively, and this is indicative of the broader challenge in supporting this type of data access.