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CMS Promoting Interoperability in 2021: All good things must come to an end?

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CMS Promoting Interoperability in 2021: All good things must come to an end?

We have spent years involved with the management of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Programs which were created by the ...

We have spent years involved with the management of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Programs which were created by the HITECH Act (2009). These programs were recently renamed Promoting Interoperability (PI) programs. In a nutshell, these programs were tied to the Medicare and Medicaid insurance programs and provided financial incentives over a number of years to ambulatory providers and hospitals to adopt and use EHRs. Vendors submitted their technology products for testing and certification that they performed specific functions and could exchange data using specified message formats. 

HLN Attends Sequoia Project Annual Meeting On TEFCA

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HLN Attends Sequoia Project Annual Meeting On TEFCA

On December 5, 2019, Michael Suralik, project manager at HLN, attended The Sequoia Project’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C.  TEFCA and Information Blocking were the big topics ...

On December 5, 2019, Michael Suralik, project manager at HLN, attended The Sequoia Project’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C.  TEFCA and Information Blocking were the big topics of the day. It was a very substantive meeting and there was vibrant back and forth discussion and exchange of ideas between and among the presenters and the other meeting participants (see this report that summarizes the meeting).

ONC PMAL Project: Creeping Forward on Patient Matching

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ONC PMAL Project: Creeping Forward on Patient Matching

Last week, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) released the final report from its Patient Matching, Aggregation, and Linking (PMAL) Proje ...

Last week, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) released the final report from its Patient Matching, Aggregation, and Linking (PMAL) Project, as well as an additional report describing a pilot project to test the Patient Demographic Data Quality Framework (PDDQ) to Support Patient Matching that was released several years ago. Funded from June 2015 through September 2018 by the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) through the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR) Trust Fund, PMAL was one of the activities I described in an earlier blog entry.

The Final Report reviews the four challenged of patient matching and linking that the PMAL project attempted to address:

ONC’s 3rd Interoperability Forum: Not Much to Report

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ONC’s 3rd Interoperability Forum: Not Much to Report

On August 21 and 22, 2019 the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) held its third Interoperability Forum in Washington, DC. More than 600 indi ...

On August 21 and 22, 2019 the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) held its third Interoperability Forum in Washington, DC. More than 600 individuals participated in person with many others viewing the general sessions via webinar. The conference began and ended with half-day plenary sessions while providing five tracks with smaller sessions in between. I attended the Health Information Exchange (HIE)/Community-based Information Exchange (CIE) breakout session on both days.

The plenaries (aside from the usual welcome and farewell messages) focused on the current state and the future state of interoperability. Lots of talk about TEFCA, FHIR, and patient-centered control of health records, but I really did not hear anything new or terribly interesting. There was a fascinating presentation by Dr. Simon Eccles, head off Great Britain’s NHSX project, but this is their third attempt at an integrated health information system and it seemed more aspirational than actual.

In the track I attended on Tuesday there was a very good session on public health and health IT, very well attended with varying presentations from CDC, AIRA, APHL, and others. The second set of presentations was on improving coordination between acute and post-acute facilities using FHIR. On Wednesday, the same track had presentations on advancing social determinants of health using FHIR (including the HL7 Gravity Project), and a second set of presentations on health IT and behavioral health. It was nice, frankly, to finally hear some presentations on this topic that were not completely dominated by the opioid crisis.

To be honest, my expectations were fairly low for this conference. FHIR was all the rage. but its limited deployment still has it fairly early in the hype cycle. Until an RCE is named and begins its work, TEFCA is still a distant idea. The major market-driven HIE activities (Commonwell, Carequality, SHIEC) did not seem to have a terribly visible presence at this meeting. In fact, the more established HIEs seemed to spend the whole conference wondering out loud why no one was recognizing their role in interoperability. Likely we will have to wait until the publication of the final rule on Information Blocking before we really know what the HIE landscape will look like for the next few years.

ONC Gets It Mostly Right with TEFCA 2.0 [Updated]

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ONC Gets It Mostly Right with TEFCA 2.0 [Updated]

See our final comments on the TEFCA v2 Draft On April 17, 2019 the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) released the second draft ...

See our final comments on the TEFCA v2 Draft

On April 17, 2019 the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) released the second draft of its Trusted Exchange Framework and Common Agreement (TEFCA) for comment. The initial version was released more than a year ago in January 2018 (see my original blog). As before, this is in response to a requirement imposed by Congress in the 21st Century Cures Act. After a somewhat lengthy (but well written) introduction, the document contains three parts (compared to just two parts the first time around):